Suva

Never mind clocks & watches and all that accurate stuff, when in Fiji one must get used to Fiji time . . .

DSC06067rJust after sunrise we approached our berth at Suva, Fiji.

Abel Tasman was the first European to sight Fiji in 1643, and this was followed by Captain Cook in 1770.

It was thanks to Captain Bligh during his epic voyage, after the mutiny on HMS Bounty that brought Fiji to the attention of the world.

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Captain Bligh sailed between the two main islands, Vanua Levu (the long island) and Viti Levu (the round shaped island that contains Suva). As you see the stretch of water is now called Bligh Water.
In 1789, Captain Bligh and eighteen of his crew were cast adrift in a small boat and the Captain navigated, without a chart, but with only a compass and a quadrant (a type of sextant) 6701 km (3618 nautical miles), which was a huge feat of navigation and he only lost one man who was killed by natives on the Tongan island of Tofua.
Bligh landed in the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia today) after a forty seven days voyage, and eventually arrived back in the England, where he took command of another ship and sailed back to Fiji and chartered the 39 islands of Fiji.

Fiji eventually became a colony of the Great Britain in 1874.

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In Suva (the capital of Fiji) there are stones markers for various happenings and dates.

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We didn’t book a ship’s tour but decided to hire a taxi for the four of us and just have the driver show us around.

On exiting the wharf area, we had quite a choice of taxi driver and in the end we picked one and away we went.

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The ship berthed close to the city centre.

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Of course, our driver took us to see the Australian High Commission – guards were happy to see us and waved, unlike a certain other embassy.

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Wherever we went we were not far from a church – about 65% of the population are Christian and take their church going seriously. The next largest religious group is the Hindu religion.

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Our driver took us to see a Mormon church – we could walk around the grounds, but we didn’t go into the main building. The main building can be seen in the above photograph, and the one above this is a distant shot.

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Everywhere was very neat and tidy.

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When I took this picture the entrance to the church was behind me and all the buildings that you can see are all part of this church. The one in the centre is the administration building, I think.

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Check the first photograph of this church and you will see the statue on the roof of the main church.

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We next drove up into the hills and came across Colo I Suva which is a rain forest eco resort, and I think we were told that it is owned by an Australian lady. As you see it had started to rain, but it didn’t last long.

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I was standing in the bar when I took this picture.

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The main hotel is across the bridge I was in a ‘satellite’ area, which was a quiet area for reading or just to listen to the birds in the trees.

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The driver then took us to a look-out point and told us of Joskes Brew. Note the alcohol percentage, at first, I thought it was a type of beer, but it is cane spirit mixed with cola. I haven’t tasted it.

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and the history of sugar cane farming.

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Paul Joske 1825 – 1898

Although Paul Joske and his partner failed to grow sugar, and lost the huge sum of £30,000, he went on to help design Suva.

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The mountain the can be seen sticking up in the above picture was originally called “Rama” or the Devils thumb, because it reminded the locals of a man trying to claw his was out of Hell.
After Paul Joske committed suicide the ‘Devil’s Thumb’ was renamed ‘Joske’s Peak’ in memory of him because of his contribution to the creation of Suva.

As an aside, Sir Edmond Hilary who was the first man to climb Mount Everest failed twice to scale Joske’s Peak. The first attempt was due to not being able to get close enough to the base due to heavy undergrowth and on the second attempt he tried to climb the wrong side. He did climb it eventually, but not until 1983, which was 30 years after he’d climbed Everest.

The ‘thumb’ is a volcanic plug that towers over a local village.

Fiji became an independent nation in 1970, with the Queen as Head of State.

From the lookout point we made our way to Government House, which used to be the residency of the Governor-General, who represented the Queen.
In 1987 Fiji became a republic after two military coups.
Government House, which was built in 1928 after a fire destroyed the original building, is now the official residence of the President of Fiji.

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Government House faces the sea, and it was from a position in front of this building that the photograph of Joske’s Peak was taken.

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A zoom facility does come in handy at times.

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There are guards at the entrance to the Government House.

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This is the plaque at the entrance to Government House.

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It had been over thirty years since I was last in Suva, but I still remembered the town centre.

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Our driver dropped us off in the city centre, which gave us time for a little shopping before walking back to the ship, which took about five minutes, because we were so close to the town centre.

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From our balcony we could see returning coaches that had taken cruise passengers on various tours, and I noticed that nearly all of the buses displayed a sunshade sign –

Jesus   no other name   no other way 

Obviously none of the locals considered this public declaration of Christianity by the company that owned the buses, or the driver that drove the bus, to be un PC.

How refreshing.

 

 

 

 

Dravuni Island

DSC06007rSunrise as we approached the island.

Dravuni Island is part of the Kadavu Group of islands, which are part of Fiji. It is a small island of about 0.8 sq km (0.3 sq miles) and the population is about 200 living in one village. It is one of the smallest populated islands in the Fijian archipelago.

There aren’t any vehicles, cinemas, shops, internet connection, but they do have peace and quiet, friendship, colourful plants, golden beaches, clear sea water and the sound of the sea as it ripples up the beach.

Ruby Princess anchored well off the shore and tender boats ran a shuttle service to and from the small island pier.

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Treasure Island perhaps  . . . . did Robert Louis Stevenson visit??

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Not everyone came ashore, but for those of us who did it was worth the effort, not that it was much of an effort.

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For me, the feeling of sand between my toes and to be able to just paddle in warm salt water is pure pleasure.

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Stepping off the beach and we were in the village. The green roofed building is the local primary school.

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School noticeboard – and two plaques are below.

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We were allowed inside, and we listened to the children singing.

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The above two photographs are thanks to Ken.

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We decided to walk to the peak, which can be seen on the right side of the map.

The walk to the peak looked easy so we set off along a dirt path.

DSC06021rThe local ladies were selling various items strung between palm trees and bushes. There wasn’t any ‘hard sell’, just a polite ‘Bula’ (a Fijian greeting) as we looked over the items for sale.

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We passed four guys (2% of the population when you think of it) who had the right idea of life. They didn’t make any effort to sell us a coconut drink, so perhaps they didn’t want to . . . after all they most probably thought that this is my island in the sun.
For those who can remember 1957. The above picture is thanks to Ken.

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Even a small island in the Pacific can have bush fires similar to the larger island in the Pacific – Australia.

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We reached part way up the hill, and looked at the climb to reach the top, and I decided that there comes a time when my pacemaker tells me ‘no more’, so I quit.

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Even from only being part way up the hill, the views were great.

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The path that we walked up . . .

Some people found a path that took them to the opposite side of the island, because they wanted a less ‘crowded’ beach –

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The above pic is the village beach – crowded??

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I took the photograph from the tender as we returned to the ship – Ruby Princess had to anchor far out because the island has a research station for the university of the South Pacific to study the Great Astrolabe Reef and the surrounding coral.

They say life is full of coincidences –

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If we were to sail from Dravuni Island 325 miles southwest, we would come across a reef and a small island called Ceva-I-Ra Reef, which until 1976, was called Conway Reef.

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HMS Conway

In 1838 Captain Charles Bethune of HMS Conway, first came across the reef and recorded it, but it was not mapped for several years, and remained a danger to ships.

Check this Conway Reef link and it is obvious that the reef is still a danger to shipping today.

In 1859 HMS Conway later became the first ship to be loaned by the British Government to the Mercantile Marine Association of Liverpool to be used as a training establishment to train young men to become officers in the British merchant navy.
I was fortunate to win a place to the Conway in 1960, before going to sea in 1962 – hence the coincidence.
When I attended HMS Conway she was a land based training ‘ship’ until 1974 when she was closed down.

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Even a visit to a quiet island like Dravuni, demands a cold beer on our return.

May I wish my readers a very Happy Christmas and a safe and healthy 2020.

 

Port Vila

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Port Vila the capital of Vanuatu, which used to be called New Hebrides.

The first Europeans to visit these islands were the Spanish, who arrived in 1606. They thought that they had found La Austrialia del Espiritu Santo or “The Southern Land of the Holy Spirit”.  The largest island was named Espiritu Santo, which has remained as the name of the largest island today.

Europeans didn’t return until 1768 when the Frenchman Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville arrived and named the islands as the Great Cyclades, but in 1774 Captain Cook arrived and he named the islands the New Hebrides, which name remained until independence in 1980.

Over the years the islands became important to both the French and the British for trade and ‘Blackbirding’ to Australia. British subjects from Australia became the dominant group of Europeans.
In 1882 a French company called Caledonian was created and over the next few years the number of French citizens soon grew to outnumber the British/Australians by two to one.

In 1906 the UK & France agreed to administer the country jointly, which created both British & French administrations, which only came together in a court of law.
In the 1920’s the French brought in workers from what we now now as Vietnam (at that time it was classed as French Annam or French Indochina). This created social and political unrest, and a movement for independence grew.

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If you are interested in the incidents at the time of Independence, may I suggest you look up the Coconut War.

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Vanuatu’s flag today

Ruby Princess went alongside in Port Vila at 8.00 am, and after clearance we were allowed ashore. We crossed the quay and exited to small dock area and then had to navigate through a zig- zag area of stalls selling various items of souvenirs.

We didn’t have a choice but to walk along the created ally-ways to gain access to taxis. It was not a hardship as many of the stalls had interesting items for sale.

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The second photograph is thanks to Ken.

Once outside we were bombarded with offers of traditional taxis and water taxis. We decided to take a water taxi, $5 AUD one way per person.

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The water taxis near the bow of the ship.

What we didn’t know was that the taxi wouldn’t be leaving until the boat owner had filled his boat – he had twelve seats for sale, and we wanted four, so we had to wait for eight other passengers. It was not a long wait because once Ruby Princess passengers could see others off the ship in the boats they followed.

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As you see the boats were not alongside a ‘normal’ pier of quay, but we climbed down the bank and into the open boat.

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These boats are waiting in town to take people back to their cruise ship, or perhaps a sightseeing tour of the harbour. The benches are clearer  . . . .

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When disembarking in town we did so at a small pier.

The trip from the cruise ship to town was about ten minutes, and I found it quite interesting.

In 2015 they suffered a cyclone, during which 24 people died, winds reached 280 km / hour (174 mph) – as we rounded an island, we saw some of the damage.

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What looked like the remains of a ferry, and a tourist sightseeing craft?

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Cargo ship or specialised vessel of sorts – I don’t know.

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What looked like an inter-island passenger ship?

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Private boats

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As we passed these wrecks, we saw the hotel located on an island in the harbour – Iririki Island hotel.
The island and the hotel has an interesting history.

Originally the island was a British hospital in 1910, after which it was the British Residency (1913). The Residency was built on the top of the island and one had to climb 179 steps from the beach to the house.

A lower house was built for the Queen when she visited the island, after which the lower house became the accommodation for the British High Commissioner.

After independence (1980) the island was abandoned, and in 1983 it was leased so that a a resort could be created.
The 1987 cyclone causes so much damage, it took a year to refurbish.

In 1991 it became a child free sanctuary, and in 2004 it was sold to a consortium of Australian businessmen.

In 2009 it became family friendly, until the cyclone of 2015, which required a huge amount of refurbishing, and the island was reopened for business in 2016.

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As you see it has a casino.

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Port Vila seems to thrive on duty free shops – the prices for duty free spirits were the cheapest I’d see in a long time, which makes one think of certain airport duty free shops and their prices . . . picture thanks to Ken.

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Port Vila looked quiet, but you still had to watch the traffic.

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We came across the local market, which had a huge choice of fresh vegetables and fruit.

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and don’t forget the flowers.

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Anchored in the harbour was a touch of yesterday.
The flag on the mast is the flag of Vanuatu.

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Across the harbour we could see the Ruby Princess, note the shallow water – our water taxi went to the left of the picture before crossing the shallow area.
Thanks to Ken for the full picture, I cropped the original to focus in the ship.

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Goodbye Port Vila

 

 

 

Lifou Island

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Lifou Island is part of the Loyalty Islands, which is part of New Caledonia, and Noumea is the capital.

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We approached the island and anchored. The tender boats from Ruby Princess would take us ashore to the small piers.

The island is 80 km (50 miles) long and 16 km (10 miles) wide, and is famous for coral, tropical fish, turtles and views. The populations is currently around 10,000 people.

The French took control of New Caledonia and the surrounding islands in 1853 and they remain as part of France today.

Maureen & I had visited the island some years ago when we cruised the area with P & O Australia, and at that time, because we were with our grandchildren, we spent our time ashore on the beach and swimming. This time we planned a little site seeing, and to take in the views.

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As we came into the bay to anchor I took the above picture and planned to climb to the top to visit the church, which I found out was called Notre Dame de Lourdes Chapel.

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It didn’t take long for the tender boats to made ready to take the passengers ashore.

DSC05858rOnce ashore we found a small market selling locally designed textiles.

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Lifou Island, being part of New Caledonia, which itself is part of France, the local signs were in French and the locals spoke French, as well as their own language, and could be understood in English. The people are Kanaks, and their culture is still maintained despite the arrivals of other cultures.

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We walked up a small hill to reach the road that would take us to the chapel.

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If you wanted a cool coconut drink, they were $3 AUD or 200 Pacific French francs.

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This guy couldn’t care less if he sold a coconut or not – he was happy.
Picture thanks to Ken.

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After a walk of about ten to fifteen minutes we came across the path that led up to the chapel. The climate was humid, but tolerable, so I started up the rise which didn’t feel all that bad until I moved further up and realised that it was getting steep, and I could see how steep – so I chickened  out, and Maureen & I sat at the bottom waiting for our friends to return.

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Too steep for me – picture thanks to Ken

The palm tree on the right in the picture that shows the beginning of the climb had an unusual ‘fruit’ or seed, I’m not sure which, but I took a picture . . .

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It wasn’t a pineapple!

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On our return to the pier area we listened to a choir of locals – there is something in the harmony of the Pacific islanders when they sing as a choir  the link is of the New Caledonia Choir.

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We saw this monument, but we were unable to find out if it had a significant meaning – it was located within an area that was fenced off, so we couldn’t get in the check. Perhaps it indicates the way to St Francois -Xavier church.

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The locals had a large map to allow visitors to get an idea of where to go and what to see.

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We decided to return to the ship for lunch, the tender boats ran a continuous ferry service so one didn’t have to wait too long.

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This is not a trick – but as I walked along the small pier to the tender boat, I looked over the fence and saw a turtle – out came the camera and I took a few shots, but none captured the turtle – but I’m happy to say that I saw it, and was surprised that it was so close to the beach considering all the human traffic around.

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A tropical beach & the sea enslaves my imagination  . . .

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Home James, a cold beer awaits . . .

Remembrance

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British merchant navy flag, with poppy – Ruby Princess flew the Red Duster.

We anchored off the island of Lifou (New Caledonia) at 9.00 am on the 11th November, and many of us went ashore via tender.

Maureen & I and our friends were walking to a lookout point when we heard the sound of a trumpet, and turned to see the ship – it was 11.00 am so we stopped and faced the ship, as did a number of other passengers from the Ruby Princess.
We were a small group of strangers (other than our two friends) that had suddenly come together in a common desire, and so focused on the ship.
The group of about ten strangers didn’t move until the sound of the ‘clear’ at the end of the minute’s silence, all of us locked in our own thoughts of those who sacrificed their ‘today’ for our ‘today’.

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The ship, as we saw her through the vegetation.

We returned to the ship at lunchtime because we wanted to take part in the planned memorial service in the afternoon.

The service was held at 4.00 pm in the theatre to commemorate all those who gave their lives for our freedom,service sheet

Captain Steven Lewis of the Ruby Princess officiated.

The Captain said a few words as he opened the ceremony.

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The service sheet had four pages and on the second page was a poem, I do not know your name’, by Sherrie Ball and it was read by the cruise director.Page one

The poem is on the left after which we all sang ‘O God Our Help in Ages Past’, the theatre was not full, but the service was very well attended, so I felt comfortable belting out the hymns without feeling embarrassed, because I do not have a singing voice.

The assistant cruise director read Heroes by Jared Jenkins – this was followed by another hymn, ‘Holy Holy Holy.’Page two

Mathew Murtagh sang  Bring him home  – I couldn’t find Mathew Murtagh singing this song, but I found a clip with the same feeling.

This was followed by the Captain reading ‘In Memoriam’, followed by ‘In Flanders Field’, and then we all sang Amazing Grace.

sheet three The short time together ended with the 23rd Psalm, The Lords Prayer and the Responsive Reading,
The Act of Remembrance was read by Captain Lewis, which was followed by the trumpeter from the ship’s band playing The Last Post , and finally, after the minute’s silence, Reveille.

Quite a few people displayed their medals, which added to the ambiance of the ceremony.

I thought that it was a touching ceremony and a credit to all the staff of the Ruby Princess.

 

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Tower of London’s former old moat filled with thousands of poppies on
Remembrance Day 2019.

Entertainment & a drink

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With a capacity of 800 you had to be seated at least 30 minutes before the show began.

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The Princess ships have their own dancers and singers, and their own musical backing – in addition, various outside entertainers are engaged for one or two nights. They would fly in – entertain the passengers and fly out from the next convenient port.

The ship’s dancers and musician were permanent. Maureen & have cruised with four different cruise companies and found that the ship’s resident entertainers (singers & dancers) have been excellent.
Princess cruises has a dance studio in California (I think) where the dancers and singers are trained, and new shows created. The shows are rotated throughout the fleet, but we’ve never seen the same show on different ships.

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The finally of the first show on the Ruby Princess.

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The following evening we went to see Patrick McMahon, singer, songwriter & entertainer. I’d never heard of him, but he was very good and after checking details about him I realised what I’d been missing. He sang a number of different styles of music from country, jazz, rock & roll etc. He was so full of energy that I became tired watching him as he jumped all over the stage while playing instruments.
He has more energy than someone half his age, and when you see the clip remember he is 60 years old!

A few nights later we saw Chris Gable (we missed a couple of nights due to shore excursion)

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Boy was this guy good – he could play the clarinet, saxophone, piano, guitar, and he could sing! Chris Gable the link will take you to a sample of his musical skills. If you wish for Glen Miller fast forward to near the end.

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At the end of the show he played the wind instruments for  Golden Wedding and the ship’s drummer at the back was able to match Gable’s skill – the drummer was just great.
The link is not to Chris Gable or the drummer, but to the piece of music.

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At the end the audience went mad . . . not just for Chris Gable, but also for the drummer!

Chris Gable was so popular they arranged an additional show later in the cruise, and he produced a different musical show, which was just a popular with the audience.

We also watched comic conjurer, but I didn’t take any photographs as I thought he was disappointing.

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Another night we watched Suzanne Ptentice a New Zealand singer from Invercargill.
She sang a mixture of songs, but as my knowledge of country western music is limited I’d never heard of her. She was awarded the OBE by the Queen in 1995 for services to music. She was very pleasant.

The following night is was the resident dancers and singer in a show called Once upon a Dream. This show was a mixture of classical, Beatles and bits of POP – I thought is was well done as it was supposed to be a dream and as we know dreams are always mixed-up.

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A young girl has a dream . . .

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from Alice in Wonderland

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For some reason the dancing camels reminded me of  Wilson & Keppel    from a 1934 film – and before someone asks, no I was not at the premier of this film!

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A change of pace and time tone to the 18th century . . . the cast worked hard and were very good – singing & dancing at the same time.

Our last port of call was Noumea, where Jon Darsk joined the ship. Another great entertainer – piano player, violinist, singer and a personality to match.

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He would play the piano as fast as he could with one piece of music, and then switch to boogie woogie, everything just flowed.

In the theater staff walked around ready to take orders for drinks before the entertainment started, so I thought I’d post the cost of a sample of the drinks.

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There was a large variety of cocktails – I have only posted a couple of pages as samples, all the prices are Australian dollars.

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The above is the cost of white wine, it is obvious that you are encouraged to buy a bottle, which will be cheaper than the cost of four single glasses.

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and the cost of the reds . . . .

But if you only drink beer –

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The cost of a non-alcoholic bottle of beer is more expensive than in a Sydney restaurant.

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All the above photographs of the drink’s lists are thanks to our friends who were travelling with us.

If you are considering a cruise and you like a drink with your meal make sure you build the above costs in to your budget.

I could have bought a ‘drinks package’ that would have allowed me to have up to 15 drinks for a set daily rate, which was about $89 AUD.
Even in my younger days I’d have had trouble drinking fifteen drinks EVERY day.
To break even you’d have to drink 10 bottles of beer a day or six glasses of red (the package doesn’t include bottled wine), or six and a half glasses of white. The cruise was 14 days so the drinks package would have cost $1,246 (AUD) per person. This has to be taken into account when budgeting.

The idea of inexpensive duty-free drinks that used to be the norm when travelling by sea, before the cruise craze came about, has disappeared.

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Mural in the Crooners Bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food & wine

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As part of the cruise we were entitled to a complimentary visit to a specialist restaurant. Not being a great fan of Italian food or fish, I voted for the Crown Grill. In addition, we had a voucher for a bottle of wine not to exceed $70 (AUD). I’d never bought a bottle of anywhere near $70, so this was an experience. I managed to find a Calrendon Hill, syrah for $70, which was one of the cheaper wines . . . .

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Crown Grill Ruby Princess – picture off the internet, mine didn’t come out!

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Black tiger prawns as an appetizer.

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Goats cheese salad followed by

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Black & Blue onion soup, which included Jack Daniels . . .

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For me the pièce de résistance,
an 8 oz filet mignon, medium / rare cooked to perfection.
I used the goats cheese salad to accompany the meat.

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A light pudding, one must watch one’s weight . . .

Overall, we enjoyed the meal, but later on I’ll make a comparison with another specialty restaurant.

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Samples of a few dishes from the main dining room – every evening we had a two page menu, which allowed me to try various items that I might not try from a restaurant close to home. From memory the above is a shellfish terrine with prawns & scallops as a starter.

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An Asian dish – Singapore or Thai noodles with tofu (the white bits), and chicken.

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A prawn main dish – although we had three or four dishes for dinner, the amount of food for each dish was not excessive, so at the end of the meal one didn’t feel over full. Portion control also controlled my weight.

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Grapefruit scallop salad as a starter – nice and tangy.

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​Prosciutto with melon, but I can not remember the sauce.

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Well presented and colourful

The main dining room menu covered ‘Starters’, Soups & Salads, Mains and a separate menu for sweets & puddings.

Later we decided to try Curtis Stone’s – Share- restaurant, which was the second specialty restaurant. The extra cost was $35.00 AUD, ($29 USD) per person. The dinner would be six courses, without wine unless you took your own or bought it from the wine list.

Princess Cruises operate a system that you can board with a bottle of wine for each person in your party (adults) free of surcharges, if the wine is drunk in your cabin. You are permitted to take additional bottles at the time of boarding for a ‘corkage fee’ off $15 AUD per bottle, which is what we did and boarded with two bottles each and I paid $30 corkage. By paying the corkage I could take the bottle to any restaurant and ask them to serve it during the meal. If I didn’t finish the bottle it would be stored for the following evening in the ship’s store ID’d with our cabin number and ship’s card number.

Having experienced the $70 bottle at the Grill I produced my $10 bottle ($25 after paying corkage) for the Curtis Stone evening.

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I only hope Paul Mas was pleased  . . .

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Entrance to the Curtis Stone Sharing – reception was behind the glass case on the right.

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This picture thanks to our friends with whom we were travelling.

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Inside the restaurant – it was a very pleasant ambiance and the lady who served us was excellent, she answered all our questions and explained the choices and the dishes that we picked – don’t forget we had six courses to pick.

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We could have been in any good restaurant in Sydney, plenty of space between the tables.

course one STARTER

Charcuterie
’Nduja is a spicy, spreadable salami that comes from the southernmost Italian region of Calabria.
Cured from prosciutto, with prominent chilies and spices.
Choice of beef bresaola, duck prosciutto, or fennel-infused finocchiona.
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course two SALAD

Tomatoes and Burrata
A variety of local tomatoes paired with oregano oil and dressed fennel leaves
Asparagus and Radish
Lightly roasted asparagus with arugula pesto, red bell pepper relish and
sourdough croutons
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course three PASTA–MADE FRESH DAILY

Pork Ravioli
Green curry filling coated in lemongrass cream, and topped with crunchy chicharrones
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Ricotta Cavatelli
Roasted sunchokes, pickled beets and a Castelmagno espuma
I’m not a fan of pasta, but this dish was quite tasty.

course four:
Sea Lobster Bisque: Quick-seared cold-water lobster tail pieces with Madeira crème fraîche and fennel confit
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Once again, not being a fan of shellfish, but enjoyed this dish. One has to be
adventurous’ on holiday . . .

course five
Strip Loin Steak
Charred and sliced New York steak on top of a pomme purée, with braised mushrooms
and a porcini jus
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Medium rare – beautiful.

course six
Almond Marzipan
Warm cake paired with strawberry coulis, candied almonds and crème fraîche ice cream
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Followed by coffee –
Overall a lovely meal that was different (for me that is, thanks to the pasta & shellfish) and I never felt over full.
Quiet music in the background – good company – nice wine, a perfect evening.
We all enjoyed the Curtis Stone restaurant a little more than the Crown Grill.

The idea of the title ‘Share’ is that we would share part of each dish with family & friends – we didn’t Share but stuck to our own choices! Love & friendship only goes so far . . .

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Picture thanks to our friends.