Southern Highlands part 2

Waterfall & Potatoes

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We decided to visit Fitzroy Falls because the last time were visited the falls was in 2006 and at that time the falls were covered in mist. The above is the river that feeds the falls and as you see it is not very ‘active’ due to it being the end of summer.

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The river flows under a walkway towards the ‘falls’.

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The falls during our visit in 2006.

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The falls earlier this month (March 2021) the drop is 81 mt (266 feet).

The falls are in the Morton National Park, the traditional country of the Yuin people and the views are magnificent – my poor effort do not do the views justice.

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The area is famous for the wildlife – kookaburras, black cockatoos, eagles & falcons as well as certain insect life.

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Termite architecture. 

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and of course the platypus.

In 1798 a platypus was sent to England for identification, because people had never seen such a creature.

The English at the time thought the animal was a hoax- because it had a muzzle like a duck – a tail like a beaver – webbed feet with claws – the back legs of the male have poisonous spurs, which can kill attackers as large as a dog – the platypus is an egg laying mammal – it suckles its young, but it does not have any nipples – is it any wonder the English thought it was a hoax?

They live in the quiet areas of eastern Australia in clean freshwater streams or lakes and the best time to see them is early morning or in the evening – they are very shy.

We were close to a small town (village) called Robertson (pop 1865 in 2016) which is famous for a particular type of potato.
Like every other town which is famous for something they have to a ‘big’ something from a sheep, or a prawn, or a bandanna, so of course this town had a large potato.

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The Big Potato – Robertson the home of the Highland spud.

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Next door was the local supermarket which sold bags of potatoes (in various sizes ) with The Big Potato logo on each bag of course.

Our next stop was a pie shop that had become famous and when I asked the location I was told to keep driving and it is well sign posted.
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  So we were looking for something like the above . . . . . . . 

Pie shop2 But all we saw was a dilapidated building without any indication that this was the place we wanted. So, we kept going and ended up driving half way down a very winding Macquarie Pass with bends at a top speed of 15 km / hour (9 mph) before I was able to find a place where I could do a U turn. 

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Traffic coming down hill with a trailer / caravan did not leave much room. 

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On the way back we realised that what we thought was a dump was the pie shop being repainted.

We entered the shop to check out the pies, I was quite looking forward to a pie or two for our lunchtime picnic  –
I did not buy, because the prices were too expensive at $9 to $10 for a very small pie and around $25 for a ‘family’ size pie, if the family was not more than two adults. Suddenly, I had lost my appetite. So, we left.

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On our return trip to Mittagong we passed the Wingecarribee Reservoir. The area is a picnic spots and lookout points that is only available for day visit –
overnight camping is not allowed. 
Upstream of the Wingecarribee River that feeds the reservoir, is an ancient peat swamp, home to many endangered species.
The reservoir supplies Bowral and Mittagong, and during drought times can top up Sydney’s water supplies.

In drought times Wingecarribee Reservoir water can be released into the Wingecarribee River – which flows via another river and a lake before entering into the Sydney supply system via Warragamba Dam.
The distance from Wingecarribee Reservoir to Sydney is about 130 km by road.

Sydney has eleven major dams (21 storage dams) to supply the city with water.

Remember the walkway at Fitzroy Falls just before the actual falls – the second photograph at the beginning of this blog?

The Falls after a drop of rain