A few hours in Bombay.

I know it is now called Mumbai, but for me it will always be Bombay, and our guide spoke of the city using both names. We were told that many people living in Bombay still referred to their home city as Bombay.

DSC05927r
As we sailed closer to the harbour we overtook an Indian naval vessel.

DSC05933rThe skyline that I remember from fifty years ago.
Gateway to India and the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel on the left of the Gateway.

DSC05938rWe saw many war ships alongside, including an aircraft carrier and these torpedo boats.

DSC05943rA touch of the old days with a double decker bus.

DSC05946r
A street full of second hand books – they are never packed away just covered with sheets at night.
There must have been thousands of books. The blue tint is due to the windows of our bus.

DSC05958r  Victoria terminus built by the British.

DSC05959rHousing being refurbished.

DSC05963r
Health and safety – scaffolding held together with string and rope.
We also saw men on the roof, and of course they didn’t have safety harnesses or hard hats.
Basically they worked as the older members of my readers worked in the late 50’s & 60’s.

DSC05969rGateway to India, it hasn’t changed since the 1920’s.
It was the gate that the last British troops symbolically marched through as they left India in 1947.DSC05971rThis is the hotel that suffered a terrorist attack some years ago, the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel. The hotel is located across the road from the Gateway to India.DSC05975rAn interesting day out on a boat ride for the locals – all full of colour.

DSC05989r

                             Next stop was the ‘Lunch Box’, near Church Gate railway station.
The lunch box delivery system is unique – a business man’s wife produces a hot mid-day meal, which is collected by dedicated people and then ‘trained’ to the city centre. Outside the railway station others co-ordinate the final delivery to the office of the business man.
Late in the afternoon the meal ‘box’ is returned via the same system to the lady of the house, and the whole thing is repeated the following work day.
There is a very good commercial film called ‘The Lunch Box’, which is part in English and part in Hindi (with sub titles) that explains the whole process much better than me and is quite funny in parts.
The above picture shows the ‘lunch boxes’ being coordinated for various delivery people.

DSC05994rSome are delivered via trolly.

DSC05995r
Most are delivered via bicycle.

DSC05996r
Packing ones bike and maneuvering with so many tourists can be a pain,

DSC05998r
and it can be hard work.

DSC06007r
Next stop is the laundry, also called Dohbi ghats, where the laundry of Bombay is cleaned.
But first we have to catch a train.DSC06009rThe Indian lady is our guide and we were warned to disembark the train quickly at our destination, because the train only stopped for about 30 seconds.

DSC06010rOur window – without glass.

DSC06011r
Air conditioning

DSC06021r
Dohbi Ghat from the road.

DSC06023r

Each of the stone areas, within Dohbi Ghat, is passed down through the family generation after generation.

DSC06024r
Drying clothes – they do say that less than 0.1% of the laundry is lost, because each Dhobi walla has his own mark, which is placed in an unseen area of the clothing.

DSC06025rI wonder what happens to a person’s feet when they are in water all their working life.

DSC06029rOf course we have the crowds and the hawkers.

DSC06030r
We did see the occasional horse and cart.

DSC06033r
and the cows in the street are common.

DSC06034r
Never short of traffic.

DSC06035r
Our last visit was to Gandhi’s house – the above is the room where he worked and slept.

DSC06037rDSC06039rThe outside of his house.

Back to the ship and two days at sea before Muscat in Oman.

Author: 1944april

Traveled a great deal - about 70 countries - first foreign country I suppose was Wales, which was only 80 miles away from where I was born. Visited each Continent, except Antarctica, and I doubt that it is on my bucket list - too cold. I love Asian food, Australian wine & British beer & trying to entertain by writing.

2 thoughts on “A few hours in Bombay.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s